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11 Comments

  1. E
    May 17, 2018 @ 9:03 am

    Resident Brewing out there in SD has a pretty solid Coconut IPA

    Reply

    • GT Wharton
      May 19, 2018 @ 4:31 pm

      We’ve tried it and liked it, it’s just not bottled and distributed.

      Reply

  2. Scott
    May 15, 2018 @ 8:15 pm

    I would love to throw something overly hyped like Pliny in there and watch it get beat by many better IPAs today 🙂

    Reply

    • GT Wharton
      May 19, 2018 @ 4:31 pm

      Great idea – we will get working on it!

      Reply

  3. Rick Keenley
    May 15, 2018 @ 7:05 am

    Good article and reviews. I think it would have been fun though to throw in a tried and true one just to calibrate the tasters. Like Stone IPA or Breckinridge Vanilla Porter. The only problem with this is that you might alienate some people if they think they have been tricked.

    Reply

    • GT Wharton
      May 19, 2018 @ 4:33 pm

      I think for the next one we will improve on the methodology and I definitely agree on adding in a beer that everyone has had before.

      Reply

  4. Terry Yarham
    May 14, 2018 @ 10:03 pm

    Great article. Always interesting to hear other takes on beer – we try new beers every week and the descriptions that we come up with are sometimes similar, sometimes different than the bottle liner notes. It’s easy to think you taste something when it’s been suggested to you, it’s another thing to taste it blind.

    Reply

  5. Kevin Augustine
    May 14, 2018 @ 5:20 pm

    Great review. I hope you do more of these. Not a fan of sour beers . Haven’t tried any of theses but will for sure. Wrote down Peeper, Monday Night Space Leettuce, Perrin No Rules, Modern Times Tortuga, Monday Night Mischief, and for sur Horus

    Reply

    • GT Wharton
      May 14, 2018 @ 6:55 pm

      Hey Kevin,

      Thanks for the kind words. Some of these beers see limited market distribution, especially Horus. Modern Times is mostly Southern California, Monday Night is mostly Georgia from what I know. Probably the easiest one to find is Maine Beer Co. All of their beers are spectacular. They come normally in single 16oz bottles with very minimalist, all white labels with tiny font. Best to find a good bottle shop and see what’s available to you or use a craft beer mailing service like Craft Shack, Bine & Vine, or any number of others out there.

      GT

      Reply

  6. TableHop Games
    May 14, 2018 @ 3:13 pm

    Wow, epic review! I love the idea of guessing the styles blindly. I did that in a wine tasting recently and everyone guessed the styles incorrectly despite labeling themselves as ‘wine enthusiasts’. Also in the wine tasting, we had to guess the cost as well, which made it hilarious that the average person couldn’t differentiate the $8 bottle from the $40 bottle, which begs the question of whether we should be buying expensive wine if our palates cannot tell the difference. Heck, there was even a two-buck-chuck in there that went mostly unnoticed. What are your thoughts on this in regards to beer? Should we be spending money on more expensive beer if in reality we probably cannot tell a marginal difference? Would you include cost in your next blind beer tasting?

    Reply

    • GT Wharton
      May 14, 2018 @ 7:05 pm

      Guessing the style blind was a great idea from a friend of mine. In most judging competitions, the category is known and you are always judging the beer based on that category. With the category obscured, it makes it more challenging. But more importantly, it lets you see how far off-base a beer is to hitting the intended style (or perhaps how far off your palate is if you are outnumbered by other tasters).

      I’m all about great beer being cheaper and easier to acquire. For instance, I just picked up to review Maui Brewing and Crooked Stave’s collaboration called Two Tickets to Paradise. This comes in 12oz cans that you can grab as singles at Trader Joe’s for $4. I drank it last night and it would put most $30-40 750mL special release sours to shame. I’m all about that. Modern Times had done superbly with Black House and Fruitlands, giving us cans of $13 4-packs of 16oz cans that pack a flavor usually reserved for large format, pricey bottles. One of the biggest things I mention in my review is how hard it is now to compete with something like Pizza Port Swami’s IPA, $13 per 6-pack of 16oz cans that are world-class. Consider that Costco now sells AleSmith, Modern Times, and Pizza Port 16 packs – these are game changers.

      I think adding in cost would be a really fun variable to throw in there. This variable is completely overlooked by all beer judging and almost always ignored in beer reviews on all media platforms. We trust that cost is fair based on raw materials, but clearly it is based on many other things like scale of production and retail contracts.

      If there’s a phenomenal cheap beer out there, I want to know. I made that a big issue in my review of Firestone Walker Lager, which is very good, but tastes close to a macro lager but has the same price as all other craft beer on the shelf – a dangerous combination. The marginal difference from a macro is probably not great enough in my opinion for the average consumer. I recently got my hands on Sam Adam’s NE IPA, which is probably the cheapest one out for this trendy style and it was very solid – review forthcoming.

      Thanks again and hopefully we will have another blind panel test to write up in the future.

      Reply

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